The story of the Yang Style is long and impressive.  It is mixed with legends, theories, and folklore.   Many versions are taught today.

Several reputable opinions concerning Tai Chi’s origin exist.

One thing is obvious… Taijiquan did not just “pop” into someone’s head, …and it is still, evolving and being refined.  

Current styles have evolved through major changes in religious, philosophical, and economic changes within China as well as foreign invasions, domestic peasant uprisings, and major shifts in governmental policies.

Taijiquan has evolved into many “styles” or schools ….

Today in the West,  significant differences are common in the postures from one geographic region to another and from one teacher to another….   Many Taiji enthusiasts never venture from their own small study-group and do not realize … other forms and styles are practiced. 

More can be found at qi-journal.com  including an  Historical Time Line of Chinese History 

Dr. Bobbert has studied and researched the various styles, myths and publications in order to emulate the original Yang Style as much as possible.

One caveat — We’ve simplified some of the kicks and low postures since our clients are older.

 Teaching the large motor skill movements is easy and done by many.  We include fine motor skills believed to better  help develop good mental and physical health.

 Some classes also add the martial elements. Dr. Bobbert earned his Nidan rank in Aikikdo in 2011 which helps him with Tai Chi’s martial elements.  Should you want to investigate his martial skills click the button”Nidan” test.   Tai Chi has no belts but this shows what a practitioner of Tai Chi and Aikido can do at the age of 72 with opponents in their 20s and 30s. 

To help you remember the postures we developed a MEMORY CHAIN  which you can see and print out by clicking Dr. Bobbert’s MEMORY CHAIN.

 YANG STYLE  24  POSTURE FORM

1 The Standard Simplified Beijing 24 Taijiquan Form (Short Form) was developed from various styles so each movement is described by various words.  The editor chose the following to use with his students.  The various names for the “postures” or Movement Names
for Standard Simplified
Taijiquan 24 Form
can be found on the web site   http://www.egreenway.com/taichichuan/short.htm#List )2 (List edited/shortened  by Dr. Larry C. Bobbert 1/9/2011. )
The full article with authors commentary can be accessed on the web at  http://www.egreenway.com/taichichuan/short.htm#List   

My favorite video can be found at             http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLxJsqV6qcM

A couple movements that we include ( based on how I was taught) are left out of this video.

Descriptions and Instructions for the 24 Movements 
Standard Simplified 24 Taijiquan Form
The form is divided into Sections: 
  Section 1, Movements 1 – 5  
 Section   2.  Movements 6 – 9
Section 3.  Movements 10 – 15    
Section 4,  Movements 16 – 19    
Section 5, Movements, 20 – 24
First Section of Standard Simplified 24 Form Tai Chi (Yang Style) 
Movements 1 – 5
Before you begin your Tai Chi  practice, be sure to do some walking and/or progressive warm up exercises
.
1.  Opening Posture  Raising Hands and Lowering Hands.
Variations of names include: WuJi, Standing Quietly, Reconnecting with Oneness and Emptiness, Quiet Standing
Mediation 
Beginning,  Starting Posture, Commencing

    For an explanation of the directional scheme used check the Cloud Hands web page
Face N 12 (1a) .    (When practicing pick a “North” direction and start all practice facing that direction.)
Stand at attention for awhile.  In Taiji and Qigong, standing quietly in a meditative posture for awhile is the first phase.
Relax (Sung).  Shoulders are down, hands relaxed and gently touching the side of leg, and head is erect.
This is  WuJi (empty state), or standing like a tree (Zhan Zhuang), and Reconnecting with Oneness and Emptiness.
Breathe easily and comfortably.  
Sink weight into right leg, and then step out to the left to shoulder width (1b).  
Gently raise both
arms up (1c), palms facing down, to about shoulder height (1d).  
Lower both arms, palms down, to Dan Tien height, and lower
knees (1e).
The lower 
Dan Tien is a sphere of energy located a few inches behind and below the level of the navel or belly
button
; the middle Dan Tien is located in the heart area, and the upper Dan Tien is located behind the eyes in the brain. The
most important for Taijiquan is the lower Dan Tien.
Breathe in at 1a, breathe out as you step to 1b.
Breathe in as arms float up 1b-1c, and breathe out as arms float down (1d-1e).
This is movement often called “Raising Hands and Lowering Hands.”
 Breathe normally as you stand, relax, and center in
position 1a.  Breathe in through nose, and out through the nose.  Slow the respiration rate to inhaling for 4-5 seconds, holding
the full in-breath for 1-2 seconds, exhaling slowly for 4 to 5 seconds, pausing 1-2 seconds before beginning the yin/yang cycle
of breathing again.
The book Traditional Chen Style Taijiquan (Fan Chun-Lei and A. Frank Shiery, p.37)  describes the Opening Posture of
Taijiquan (#1, 1b) as follows
“1.  Preliminary Stance:  Stand naturally upright with feet placed shoulder-width apart, toes pointed slightly inward, and arms
hanging naturally at the side.  The body should be kept upright with the shoulders relaxed, eyes slightly closed and breathing
naturally.  The body should face north.  The mind should remain empty, calm and clear.  This is the state of WuJi, (Negative
Terminus in Taoist Teaching).  
    2.  Commencing Form:  The body should exhibit being relaxed externally while solid within.
The head is held naturally erect as if pulled upward by an invisible string.  Close the lips slightly with the tongue touching the
upper palate.  The toes firmly grasp the ground with Yongquan point pulled upward.   The eyes are looking straight ahead with
the chin drawn slightly inward.  The hip is turned up and the coccyx turned back and upward with the waist directed downwards.
The whole body should remain relaxed.  A mind state of intent is maintained while the vital energy flows upward from the Dantian
to the Baihui point, while the turbid energy flows downward from the Dantian to the Yongquan point.  During this time, the body
exhibits no external movement.  Yin/Yang, for example, closing/opening, supple-firm and fast-slow are manifested internally,
portraying the image of the Taiji, (Grand Terminus) (1b).

2.  Parting the Wild Horse’s Mane  
Variations of names for this movement include:  Wild Horse Waves His Mane,
Move in a straight line from E3 towards W9 in Movement #2.  Part the Wild Mustang’s Mane Three Times: 1. To the left side
(2e), 2. To the right side (2j), and 3. To the left side (2o).
When performing the short form, players should: move slowly and continuously, keep the movements rounded, move without
great effort, relax, keep the head up, let the mind direct the movements, avoid bouncing, and maintain an upright posture.
Breathe in through the nose and out through the mouth, breathe deeply and regularly, breathe in when pulling back or reaching
up, and breathe out when going forward or reaching down.

Gently rise up to normal height (2a).  Circle right arm counter-clockwise up to chest height, with the palm facing down.  Draw left
arm to waist, with the palm facing up (2a).  Imagine holding a ball between the two hands.
Turn the waist to NE1 (2b).  Draw the left foot to the side of the right foot (2b).  Hold Tai Chi “energy ball” with right hand, palm
down, at chest height; and left hand below, palm up, at Dan Tien height (2b).
Relax and gently inhale.
“Part Wild Horse’s Mane to the Left” – step diagonally with the left leg (2d), bring left hand out, palm up, to about chest height
(2e).  Exhale as the left arm extends.  Left elbow is slightly bent.  Right hand moves down to right hip (2e), with the right palm
down.
End with chest facing W9, left hand to SW7.  Left bow stance with 60% of weight in forward left leg (2e), left knee bent; and, 40%
of weight in rear right leg, with leg bend.  Head upright.   Shoulders down.
“Part Wild Horse’s Mane to the Right” – draw the weight back into the right leg, pivot on left heel (2f), drawing the left hand back
as the torso turns to face SW7 (2g).
Step forward with the right foot to side of left foot (2g).  Step out the right leg to the diagonal (2i).
Exhale as the right arm extends (2i).  Right elbow is slightly bent.  Left hand moves down to left hip (2j), with the left palm down.
End with chest facing W9, left hand to NW11.  Right bow stance with 60% of weight in forward right leg (2j), right knee bent; and,
40% of weight in rear left leg, with leg bend.  Head upright.  Shoulders down.
“Part Wild Horse’s Mane to the Left” (same as first parting) draw the weight back into the left leg, pivot on left heel (2k), drawing
the right hand back as the torso turns to face SW7 (2k).  Step forward with the left foot to side of right foot (2l).  Step out the left
leg to the diagonal (2m).  Exhale as the left arm extends (2n).  Left elbow is slightly bent.  Right hand moves down to right hip
(2o), with the right palm down.
End with chest facing W9, right hand to SW7(2o).  Left bow stance with 60% of weight in forward left leg (2o), left knee bent;
and, 40% of weight in rear right leg, with right leg bend

3.  White Crane Spreads Its Wings   Bai E Liang Chi
Variations of names include:  White Stork Spreading Its Wings, White Crane Lifts Its Wings, White Stork Cools Its Wings
Move in a straight line from E3 towards W9 in Movement #3.

2o = 3a.  From 3a draw the right foot forward a half step (3b).  The right hand moves upward (3b) as the left hand moves
downward (3b).  Draw the left foot backward (3c) as the right hand moves up and left hand moves down (3c).
Finish (3d) with the right hand above the head and palm forward, in a left toe stance with 90% of the body weight in the back
right leg, and the left hand rests along left leg with palm down.
End with chest and Face facing W9.
Relax and exhale as the weight settles down in the back right leg.
Notice how the body turns at the waist slightly to left SW7 (3b) and then to the right NW11 (3c) before it settles to face W9.  This represents the subtle
internal rotation of the Dan Tien, a “silk reeling” movement, more pronounced in the Chen Style of Taijiquan than in Yang Style Taijiquan, but still
present in all styles of Taijiquan.  Many movements in the 24 Form include this turning of the waist from side to side, and rotation of the Dan Tien.4.  Brush Knee Twist Step
      
Variations of names for this movement include:  Twist Step, Brush Knee, Palm Strike; Brushing Your Knees and Stepping;
Move in a straight line from E3 towards W9 in Movement #4

3d = 4a.  Brush left knee and right palm strike (4a-4h).  Left Knee and palm Twist Step (4b),
turn body clockwise (4c-43), Brush Left Knee (4f), Right Palm Forward Strike (4h).  End with chest and face facing W9, look to
W9 (4h).  4h = 4i.
Brush right knee and left palm strike (4i-4o).  Twist Step (4j), turn body counter-clockwise (4k-4l), Brush Right Knee (4m), Left
Palm Forward Strike(4o).  End with chest and face facing W9, look to W9 (4o).  4o = 4p.
Twist Step, Brush Left Knee, Right Palm Forward Strike.
End with chest facing W9.
5.  Playing the Lute

Variations of names for this movement include: Play the Guitar, Strumming the Lute, Hand-hold the Lute, Playing the Pipa,
Move in a straight line from E3 towards W9 in Movement #5.

4u = 5a.  End with chest facing W9, and look to W9.
Playing the Lute “Hand-hold the Lute” (#5, 5a-5d) from the book ‘Tai Chi for Health: The 24 Simplified Forms” by Cheng Zhao
and Don Zhao, p.88:
“Form 5 resembles a person playing a lute, a common music instrument in old China’s time.  It is more accurate to describe it
as hands holding the lute, which is also a literal translation from its counterpart in Chinese.
1.  Shift the body weight onto the left leg (5a).  Life the right foot and move it a half step forward, placing it behind the left foot (5b).
    2.  Lightly shift the
body center back to sit on the right leg (5c).  Extend the left heel a little forward touching the floor in an empty stance (5c-5d).  At the same time, rotate
the waist slightly to the right (5b-5c), lift the left arm and hand upward to the nose level (5b-5c), lower the right hand to guard the inside of the left
elbow (5d).”
-  Dr. Cheng Zhao
6.  Step Back Repulse Monkey

Variations of names include: Fending Off the Monkey; Step Back to Drive the Monkey Away; Step Back and Swirl Your Arms; Reverse Reeling
Forearm (Daojuan Gong), Reverse Unfolding of Arms, Repulse Monkey
Movement is reversed.  Move backward in a straight line from W9 in the direction of E3.  Please study the recommended online
videos to see how the series of postures in this particular movement are performed. 



6a = 5d.  Right leg and right twisting (reverse reeling forearm) arm back, left arm forward, step back with left leg (6d), exchange
arms and move right palm forward (6d-6e).
Left leg and leg twisting arm back, right arm forward, step back with right leg (6g),
exchange arms and move left palm forward (6g-6h).  6h = 6i.  
Right leg and right twisting arm back, left arm forward, step back
with left leg (6k), exchange arms and move right palm forward (6k-6l).  
Left leg and leg twisting arm back, right arm forward, step
back with right leg (6n), exchange arms and move left palm forward (6n-6o).
Here is a detailed description of how to perform Repulse Monkey (#6, 6a-60) taken from a narrative by David Hann:
“Repulse Monkey (1):  Turn your right hand palm up and let it drop so that your arm moves in an arc (6a-6b).  Continue
bringing your right arm back until your hand is level with your right shoulder (6c).  Turn your left hand palm up and flat, parallel
with the earth (6c).  Notice that your torso is facing (6c) to the side (N12) (the same direction as you face when you first begin,
Raising the Chi (1a).
Step back with the left foot (6d-6e),  taking care to maintain your stance about a two fist width from your right foot, or about
shoulder width.  Now turn your torso to the left, bringing your right arm forward in a palm strike and your left arm backward as if
grabbing an opponent’s arm and pulling (6d-63).  Your right palm will now be the most advanced hand (6e).
Repulse Monkey (2):  Turn your left hand palm up and let it drop so that your arm moves in an arc (6e-6f).  Continue bringing
your left arm back until your hand is level with your left shoulder (6g).  Turn your right hand palm up and flat, parallel with the
earth (6f).  Notice that your torso is facing to the opposite side (S6).  Step back with the right foot, taking care to maintain your
stance about a two fist width from your left foot, or about shoulder width (6g-6h).
Now turn your torso to the right, bringing your left arm forward in a palm strike and your right arm backward as if grabbing an
opponent’s arm and pulling (6h).  Your left palm will now be the most advanced hand (6h).
Repulse Monkey (3):  Turn your right hand palm up and let it drop so that your arm moves in an arc (6i).  Continue bringing your
right arm back until your hand is level with your right shoulder (6j).  Turn your left hand palm up and flat, parallel with the earth
(6j).  Notice that your torso is facing (N12) to the side (the same direction as you face when you first begin, Raising the Chi.
Step back with the left foot, taking care to maintain your stance about a two fist width from your right foot, or about shoulder
width (6k-6l).  Now turn your torso to the left, bringing your right arm forward in a palm strike and your left arm backward as if
grabbing an opponent’s arm and pulling (6l).  Your right palm will now be the most advanced hand (6l).  
    Repulse Monkey (4):
Turn your left hand palm up and let it drop so that your arm moves in an arc (6l-6m).  Continue bringing your left arm back until
your hand is level with your left shoulder (6m).  Turn your right hand palm up and flat, parallel with the earth(6m).  Notice that
your torso is facing to the opposite side (S6).  Step back with the left foot, taking care to maintain your stance about a two fist
width from your right foot, or about shoulder width (6n-6o).
Now turn your torso to the right, bringing your left arm forward in a palm strike and your right arm backward as if grabbing an
opponent’s arm and pulling (6n-6o).  Your left palm will now be the most advanced hand (6o).”
                                                                                                               
-  David Hann,  Yang Style Short Form Tai Chi
7.  Grasping the Bird’s Tail – Left

Variations of names include: Grasp the Sparrow’s Tail, Grasping the Peacock’s Tail, Grasp the Bird’s Tail, Four Gates, Hold the Peacock’s Tail
“Grasping the Bird’s Tail” is the most frequently occurring movement in the Yang Style Long 108 Form.
Movement consists of four parts: Ward Off, Roll Back, Press and Push.
The general direction of movement is in a straight line from E3 towards W9 in Movement #7.
7a = 6o.  Generally, move in the direction of W9, to your left side, in Movement 7.Grasping the Bird’s Tail, Left Mode (#7, 7a-7m) from the book “Illustrations of Tai Chi Chuan Simplified”
by Y. W. Chong, pp. 27-31:
“1.  Raise the left hand arch-wise to the right (7a-7b) and stop it before the right side of the waist (7c).  At the same time bend
the right hand horizontally before the chest as if grasping a ball with both hands (7c).  Concurrently draw the left foot back and
put it close to the right one (7b-7c), with the left toes touching the ground (7c).
2.  Lift the left hand outward in a bent manner to the left as if to ward off a blow (7c-7e) and bow it horizontally at the level of
the shoulders (7e).  At the same time swing the right hand downward to the right (7d-7e) and put it beside the right thigh (7e).
At the same time stretch the left foot out and bow it forward (7d-7e).  The eyes are looking at the left forearm (7e).    [Ward Off
Left (Peng Zuo) I]
3.  Stretch the left hand forward, turning its palm downward (7f).  Concurrently turn the right palm upward and stretch it forward
until it comes below the left wrist (7f).  Then pull the two hands downward past the abdomen and swing them up backward to the
right until the right hand comes to the height of the shoulders with its palm upward (7f-7g) and the left hand comes before the
chest with its palm facing inward and the elbow bend horizontally (7g).  At the same time shift the centre of gravity to the right
foot (7g).  The eyes are looking at the right hand (7g).   [Roll Back (Lu) II]
4.  Draw the right hand back and put it at the inside of the left wrist (7g).  Push both hands forward with the left palm inward
and the right one outward (7h-7i).  At the same time bow the left leg forward (7h-7i).  The eyes are looking at the left wrist (7i).
[Press (Ji) III]
5.  Separate both hands at the distance of the breadth across the shoulders with both palms facing downward (7j-7k).   Then
lower the upper body slightly backwards (7k), shifting the centre of gravity to the right foot (7k).  At the same time draw both
hands back to the two sides of the waist with both palms facing forward slightly to the ground (7k-7l).  The eyes are looking
forward horizontally (7l).
6.  Push both hands forward and upward (7l-7m).  At the same time bow the left leg forward (7m).  The eyes are looking
forward.    [Push (An) IV]”
-   Y. W. Chong
I.    Ward Off Left (Peng Zuo)  (7b-7e)   Inhale 7b-7c, and exhale 7d-7e.  Turn torso to the left towards W9 (7e).
II.   Roll Back (Lu)  (7f-7g)  Inhale 7e-7g.  Turn torso to right towards N12 (7g).  The hand movements for Roll Back are not
shown clearly in the the above illustrations (7f-7g).   Look at right hand in the direction of NE2.
III.  Press (Ji)  (7h-7i)  Inhale 7g-7h, and exhale 7h-7i.  Torso facing W9 (7i).  Turn torso to the left towards W9 (7i).  The right
palm presses against the left forearm.  The left palm faces the body.
IV.  Push (An)  (7j-7m)  Face W9.  Push both hands, palms forward, towards W9 (7m).  Inhale 7j-7l, and exhale 7l-7m.  Torso
faces W9 (7m).

8.  Grasping the Bird’s Tail – Right

Variations of names for this movement include: Grasp the Sparrow’s Tail, Grasp the Bird’s Tail, Four Gates, Grasp the Sparrow’s Tail to the Right
Side, Hold the Peacock’s Tail
General direction of movement is in a straight line from W9 towards E3 in Movement #8.
“Grasping the Bird’s Tail” is the most frequently occurring movement in the Yang Style Long 108 Form.
Movement consists of four parts: Ward Off, Roll Back, Press and Push.
8a = 7m.  Generally, one is moving in the direction of E3, to your right side, in Movement 8.Grasping the Sparrow’s Tail – Right (#8, 8a-8o)  from “Tai Chi Ch’uan and Qigong: Techniques and Training”
by Wolfgang Metzger and Peifang Zhou, pp. 106-109:
“Assume starting position (8a = 7m): Arch steps to the left.  Left foot load about 70 percent; right foot about 30 percent (8a).
Shift weight to the right foot; left foot rotates on the heel by 90∞ to 120∞ to the inside (8b).  At the same time – with gently held,
slightly rounded arms – the hands move with the upper body to the right (8b).  Slowly bend arms, with right hand moving in an
upward arc (8b-8c), and assume the ball-holding position in front of the right side of the body (8c-8d).
While in the ball-holding position, the right foot is pulled towards the left without the toes touching the ground (8d).
1.  Peng Movement:  With an arched step to the right, pull the left hand as in Form 2 (“Parting Horse’s Mane”) in an arc down to
hip level (8e-8f), while the right forearm – different from Form 2 –   moves at a left angle in an arc forward and up (8e-8f)  until
level with the chest (8f), harmoniously coordinating it with the rotation of the body (8d-8f) and the shifting of the weight (8e-8f).
Position (8f) is the starting point for the second part of this form.   [Ward Off Right (Peng You) I]
2.  Lu Movement: This starts with a slight rotation of the body to the right SE4 (8g), not shown in the illustration.  While the body
rotates to the right, hands are rotating to face each other, the right hand moving towards the right.  Both hands – while shifting
the weight to the left leg (8f-8g) and rotating the body to NW11 – move in an arc down to the right hip level (8g).   [Roll Back (Lu)
II]
3.  Ji Movement:  Preceded by a small reaching back movement (8h), move the left hand towards the left; both hands cross at
the wrists and are pushed forward and out (8i-8k).  When pushing forward, shift the weight again to the right leg (8k).   [Press
(Ji) III]
4.  An Movement: at the conclusion of the Ji movement (8k), turn the hands so that they are crossed (8l) with the palms facing
down, right hand below the left (8l).  As the weight is shifted to the back left leg (8m-8n) – the toes of the right foot raised slightly
off the ground (8n) – the crossed hands separate again and are pulled towards the body by the elbows (8m-8n).  They are then
– with a slight shift of of the body’s weight (8n-8o) – pushed forward (8n-8o).  Do not straighten your arms out in the end position
(8o).    [Push (An) IV].”-   Wolfgang Metzger and Peifang Zhou
I.  Ward Off Right (Peng You) (8a-8f)   Inhale 8c-8d, and exhale 8e-8f.  Turn torso to the right towards E3 (8c-8e).
II.  Roll Back (Lu)   (8f-8h)  Inhale 8g-8h.  Turn torso to right towards N12 (8h).  The hand movements for Roll Back are not shown clearly in the the
above illustrations (8f-8h).   Look at right hand in the direction of NW10.
III.  Press (Ji)  (8j-8k)  Inhale 8h-8i, and exhale 8j-8k.  Torso facing E3 (8k).  Turn torso to the right towards E3 (8i-8k).  The left wrist presses against
the inside of the right forearm.  The right palm faces the body.
IV.  Push (An)  (8l-8o)  Push both hands, palms forward, towards E3 (8n-8o).  Inhale 8m-8n, and exhale 8n-8o.  Torso faces E3 (8o).  Both palms
face away from the body.
9.  Single Whip

Variations of names include: Simple Whip, Whip, Holding the Whip in One Hand, Holding a Single Whip
The general direction of movement is in a straight line from E3 towards W9 in Movement #9.
From the Push phase (9a) at the end of the Grasping the Sparrow’s Tail movement (9a = 8o), begin to rotate the arms from the
left side to the right side.
The arms draw across the body at about chest height (9a-9c).  After the arms reach the left side (9c), then they rotate back to
the right side (9c-9d).  The waist faces N12 (9c).  As the right arm gets to the right side (9d) then the hand extends in the
direction of NE1 (9e) and the hand is shaped into a beak style (thumb touches the other fingers and all fingers point down)
(9e).
The left arm is drawn up to the face level, with the palm facing the face (9e).  As the right hand forms into beak, the left leg steps
to the right, bringing the left foot fairly close to the right foot (9d-9e), and the left toe touching the ground (9e).  As the left leg
lifts and is placed to face W9, the left hand opens out towards W9 (9e-9f).  As the body settles into a left bow stance (9g), the
left hand pushes forward, palm facing out.
We end in Single Whip (9g) with the waist facing NW11, in a left bow stance, pushing with the left palm in the direction of W9,
with the right arm lifted and pointing towards NE1, beaked right hand, and looking towards W9 (9g).  Inhale 9d-9e, and exhale 9f-
9g.
You can get more explanations at    http://www.egreenway.com/taichichuan/short.htm#List